Allocating scarce resources and alternative medicine

Dialysis centers in areas such as Aleppo, Homs, and Idlib have been destroyed, looted, or occupied by armed groups, motivating our concern for allocating dialysis supplies.

Allocating scarce medical resources during armed conflict

Choosing people to save based on their potential future contribution would seem to produce the most net benefit. In a sense, of course, this is correct.

Laura MacLachlan raises the ethical issue of to whom the scarce resource should go when there is more than one patient waiting for the resource and wonders if the patient's "social worth" should be a criterion for the decision regarding allocation.

Our principles are for caregivers to use in the meantime, while this larger task remains unsolved. In the first place, this requires standardized means for translating quality-of-life considerations into numerical terms. We may also prioritize young people and children over the elderly, to save the most life-years as an alternative to saving the most lives.

Because car parts can be bought and sold, the business model is appropriate for mechanics and other trades. Traditionally, the issue has been dealt with by a complex Allocating scarce resources and alternative medicine of approaches that try to balance competing rights and duties with cost and outcome measures.

Consequently, they would have to rely on diagnosis-related allocation rules on the basis of aggregate cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness calculations — rules that have been reached at the policy level and that involve measures, such as disability — and quality-adjusted life years DALYs and QALYsregardless of the particulars of a given case.

Most cases of allocation that scholars and policymakers address are either: It is well known that the effectiveness of an intervention is not only a function of the severity of the relevant condition, but is also related to the amount of research that has been expended on developing and perfecting the intervention and to the number of times that it is performed.

However, every patient is a member of society — which is to say that every patient is a person among persons. All travel carries risk, even if it is only the risk of driving to and from an appointment. Depending on the scale of a disaster or emergency, a range of responses will be required from providers, health care institutions, regional coalitions, and public health agencies.

At the other end of the continuum is crisis care, when the best possible care is provided to the population of patients as a whole because of the very limited resources available.

Mon, Jan 29, 8: Sat, Jun 14, And if it is determined by an individual's contribution to society, then we may be back to social worth.

UK Clinical Ethics Network. Not surprisingly, the heroic anti-rejection treatments are unsuccessful, and the person goes back on insulin, back on dialysis, or in case of a liver simply dies. The discussion that follows will attempt to show how this is the case. Cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness considerations must be completely abandoned because they violate the fiduciary obligation that this physician has toward this patient here and now.

Does every patient who needs a scarce resource for health should be eligible for the resource? Given the pluralism of our society, development of such a list is nearly impossible.

One recent study of psychosocial criteria used among transplant programs found, for example, that for heart transplantation, IQ The other issue in the California case seems to be ability to adhere to the posttransplant regimen.

In Socrates' view of the ideal state, each individual's worth depends on his or her relation to the state.Allocation of Medical Resources and Scarcity. February 27, UPenn Perelman School of Medicine's blog. February 28 th, Economics is the study of scarce resources and may help shed light on these difficult decisions.

If resources are not applied to their highest value uses, re-allocation can increase the wellbeing of society.

Allocating scarce medical resources during armed conflict

We describe ethical issues arising in the allocation of civilian medical resources during armed conflict. Three features are significant in the context of allocating scarce resources in armed conflicts: the distinction between continuous and binary medical resources; the risks of armed conflict itself, and the impact of cultural differences on cases of armed conflict.

Mar 21,  · If medicine is construed as a social service model, this would mean that physicians must allocate scarce healthcare resources by applying the criterion of the greatest good for the greatest number in the case of each individual patient. We describe ethical issues arising in the allocation of civilian medical resources during armed conflict.

Three features are significant in the context of allocating scarce resources in armed conflicts: the distinction between continuous and binary medical resources; the risks of armed conflict itself, and the impact of cultural differences on.

However, allocating scarce drugs is unequivocal rationing, by which we mean “explicit mechanisms that allow people to go without beneficial [health care] services.” 11 (p28) Hence, allocation of medicine also requires an approach that is sensitive to some of the ethical pitfalls associated with rationing medical resources in general.

Allocating scarce medical resources during armed conflict. An aspect of conflict that is often overlooked is the difficult decisions that healthcare providers need to make on the allocation of medical resources .

Download
Allocating scarce resources and alternative medicine
Rated 0/5 based on 62 review